Athlete Cardio Workouts

Athlete Cardio Workouts

If you’re trying to burn fat, these cardio options will be much more helpful than a slow jog on the treadmill.

We’ve all had a great laugh while watching people do cardio workouts while talking on the phone, texting their BFF, or reading a magazine. We’ve all seen them time and again; those barely sweating, not short of breath, but all the while thinking that they’re, “getting it done.” The good news is, if you’re here that’s probably not you. You’re an athlete who trains with a purpose.

If the purpose though is to get into better shape, burn fat, or simply improve your athletic performance, then jogging on a treadmill for 30 minutes isn’t going to cut it. Here then are some different kinds of conditioning work to spice up the old fashion cardio workouts, and help you achieve the results you’re actually looking for.

Interval Training

While interval training can be done inside on a treadmill, it’s far from your stereotypical, “treadmill workout.” Doing intervals will shorten your time running, but will help keep your metabolism pumping at a faster rate throughout the day. To do these properly, you’ll sprint for a specified time and then rest for a specified time. Easy as that.

How to begin? Start out at a 0 grade incline for 10 minutes. Sprint at a speed 8 mph + for 15 seconds, then step off to the sides of the treadmill, and rest for 45 seconds. Having mastered this you can increase the incline (up to 10 degrees), or increase the speed to make it more difficult. After a couple of weeks you can bump the time up to 15 minutes, or increase the time sprinting/decrease the rest time. Believe it or not these 15 minutes will help you burn far more calories than that 20 minute run at 8 minute mile pace.

Get Outdoors:

If you want to get out of the dim, fluorescent lit, gym there’s no need to bring a stopwatch with you. Take your Ipod out to the track and throw on your favorite song. By sprinting on the chorus and jogging on the rest of the song, you’ll get the same results while getting a tan in the process.

Jump Rope Training

A jump rope is a great tool to get a quick workout, along with some light plyometric work. This can be done anywhere, and only takes 10-20 minutes. If you can’t do all of the drills proposed below, do a drill that you can. But keep in mind that each drill is performed for a minute. Start by going through the circuit below once, and then work your way up to two circuits.

Regular Double Foot Jump
Double Feet Side to Side
Double Feet Front to Back
Boxer Shuffle (2 on left foot then 2 on right foot)
Single Foot Front to Back
Single Foot Side to Side
Triangle
Four Square
Double Under
Regular Double Foot Jump

Another workout you can do would be interval-based. Do any drill (your choice) as fast as you can for 30 seconds, then rest for 30 seconds. Start at 10 minutes and work your way up to 20 minutes of interval jumping.

9 Innings of Sprints

This is a sprint program that can be done out on the field, and modified for any sport. All you need here is a few cones, and space up to 50 yards. Rest 15 seconds between each sprint, and rest 90 seconds after each inning. Each sprint should be at maximal effort.

Got it? Good. Give these three slow jog alternatives a shot this summer and I guarantee you’ll be able to burn a lot more fat and and have a lot more fun that you would with yet another boring cardio workout.

To recover faster and boost fat loss when performing HIIT, 1R would recommend the following supplements:

  1. BSN Amino X - This preworkout supplement will increase muscle endurance and protein synthesis, while giving you with the needed push to take your workouts, and results, to the next level
  2. Optimum Nutrition Threshold Beta-Alanine - Will help increase your workout capacity which will improve performance and strength during high intensity training
  3. Cytosport Creatine - By increasing your body's ATP production creatine will help you become more explosive, more powerful, and more athletic when taken before or after workouts
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About the Author

Nate Hemphill is an assistant strength & conditioning coach at the University of California-Davis where he oversees the training protocols for Men’s Soccer, Field Hockey, Women's Lacrosse, Golf, Tennis, and Women's Water Polo while assisting with Football. Prior to joining UC Davis in 2011, he was a graduate assistant strength & conditioning coach at Seattle University from 2009-2011. A 2005 graduate in Exercise and Movement Science from Missouri State University (MO), Nate worked with numerous sports at MSU as well as working with the St. Louis Cardinals in their Minor League affiliates (Rookie, AA). Nate is currently a certified CSCS from the NSCA. He is working to finish his Master’s Degree in Sports Administration and Leadership from Seattle University.